FULL HOUSE

WORDS AND IMAGES BY JOHN WILLIS

CAMPERS Lumberjack Eildon test

There are a lot of forward-fold campers on the market. And the majority are just variations of the same theme, but the Lumberjack Eildon is a camper with a defined difference; it has a deep tub with a traditional forward-fold Queen bed, while the back folds out to reveal a clever bunk, with the dinette converting into a double bed. All up, it’ll sleep five people, weighs in at 1660kg from the factory (220kg towball download) and lists at $30,999. Let’s get into this.

With a powered tent, in-built bunks and sleeping space for five people, the Lumberjack Eildon is an innovative camper in a crowded segment.

“In terms of safety, vision and looks, it’s hard to go past Clearview Powerfold Mirrors.”
Pat Callinan

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The Eildon rides on 16-inch wheels rims with orange highlights (optional) to match the decals and hammertone black enamel paint. Underneath is Lumberjack’s own independent trailing arm suspension with coil springs and twin shocks plus 12-inch electric brakes with breakaway unit and handbrake. The Eildon has a quoted tare weight of 1660Kg as it leaves the factory dry and without accessories, and a towball weight of 220kg so take care when loading the trailer, especially the nose, to ensure you don’t exceed your vehicle’s towball download limit.

Around the back are twin spare wheels, large LED taillights, a gas outlet, two of the four swing-down stabilisers, and rated recovery points.

Externally there are five storage compartments including a dedicated space for storing the extra poles needed to apply final tensioning on the tent. There is a full-width compartment formed into the front of the tub that has a sliding tray either side with one pre-wired for a portable fridge. On the driver’s side is the battery compartment holding two deep-cycle batteries and to the rear is a compartment with the main isolator switch.

What’s the outside like?
When it's all set up, the Eildon measures 5.5m(L) x 4.4m(W) meaning it’s got plenty of room for sleeping and relaxing if the weather keeps you indoors. When closed up for travel or storage, the Lumberjack Eildon measures 5.4m(L) x 2.1m(W) x 1.9m(H). The travel/storage height is a bit more than most forward-fold campers due to the deep tub allowing for greater fixed storage plus allowing for the folding frame and bunk components.

Out the front is a 100mm x 50mm x 4mm hot-dip galvanised drawbar and 3000kg 360-degree polyblock coupling. I was pleased to see the use of a premium ARK swing-up jockey wheel. There’s a tap for the 120-litre and 65-litre lockable water tanks that are well protected by bash plates, and all of the plumbing and wiring is neat, tidy and well insulated against damage from off-road travel. The drawbar also features a full-width stone guard with replaceable mesh ahead of the sizeable carpet-lined toolbox which holds two, nine-kilogram gas bottles and twin Jerry can holders.

“It's a little fiddly, but with practice, I reckon you'll soon develop a system that allows you to halve the time it took me to set the whole thing up.”

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One piece of advice is that the tent is very high, to allow for the bunks, and while this makes the whole thing feel nice and roomy, you will need to make sure you attach the awning roof before you raise the tent, or you’ll need to carry a ladder to fit it after the fact.

The canvas work is of a high-quality 14oz material with a tropical roof that erects automatically on opening. The zips and midge-mesh flyscreens all seem good quality as does the general construction with double-stitched joins used throughout. There are plenty of windows plus a café-style opening on the living side of the camper expanding the social amenity. The large 4.9m(L) x 2.4m(W) annexe follows the high roofline and includes quick-release alloy poles, full PVC flooring and a complete set of sidewalls.

Setting up camp
Once you have decided on your perfect campsite, levelled and stabilised the trailer, switch on the battery isolator, grab the remote, press GO, and the tent will then raise into place. The heavy lifting is all done by motors, but there's a little bit of fine adjustment work to do via extra poles to tension the bunk area. It's a little fiddly, but with practice, I reckon you'll soon develop a system that allows you to halve the time it took me to set the whole thing up.

There are seven internal lights including LED strip lights, a step light as well as two external LED lights and five 12-volt outlets including the dedicated fridge socket to keep all of your electricals powered up, including the cost-optional TV that stores away under the seats.

Technically, the kitchen is outside. Lumberjack’s external kitchens have evolved into very efficient appliances. This stainless-steel unit slides out easily and stabilises with drop-down adjustable legs. It features a fold-back tray over the sink that forms added bench space combining with the sinks own draining board plus a pull-out extension. You can never have too much bench space. The functional kitchen has a four-burner stove with wok burner and wind guards plus there are two sliding utensils drawers and another two drop-in compartments behind the sink, but no pantry.

What’s the interior like?
The Queen bed sits immediately to the left, at the top of a folding staircase with a privacy screen. For those with bad knees, be warned, the step-up is high due to the height of the deep tub. This does, however, allow for three handy drawers on the open face.

To the right is the main control panel with individually fused lighting and electrical switches, voltmeter, the auto tent control and water tank gauge. There’s also the head unit for the CD/USB/Bluetooth sound system with dual interior speakers. The deep tub has allowed the opportunity for a pair of windows on either side of the U-shaped dinette, a nice touch but this is more for ventilation than light, I expect. The seats are well-padded and hide storage underneath. The collapsible table is finished in a timber laminate with a floating floor.

The top bunk is described as a king single and certainly has plenty of room for a good night sleep even for someone of my large dimensions, plus the convertible dinette converts into a double bed.

So, what do we think?
Lumberjack display its confidence in the Eildon by offering a five-year structural warranty and are available either via the showroom in Geelong, Victoria, or at outlets in Slacks Creek, Queensland and Cameron Caravans in South Australia. The Eildon is a truly innovative camper trailer with a layout that will appeal to many travellers, particularly those with larger families. It’s terrific to see competition driving exciting new concepts in this popular segment.

Lumberjack Eildon specifications
TARE 1660kg (as displayed)
ATM 2400 kg
SUSPENSION Independent trailing arm with twin shock absorbers and coil springs each side
BRAKES 12-inch electric with breakaway
COUPLING 3000 kg ADR-approved polyblock
DIMENSIONS (HITCH TO TAIL LIGHTS) L 5.4m x W 2.1m x H 1.9m
AWNING SIZE 4.9 x 2.4m
PRICE AS SHOWN $30,999 (+ORCS)
MORE INFO lumberjackcampertrailers.com.au

Pros
• Innovative design;
• Good water and power;
• Big, cosy beds for five; and
• Remote-control, powered tent setup.

Cons
• A bit heavy on drawbar – watch the way you pack;
• Assembly a little trickier than some in the segment;
• High step-up to Queen bed; and
• No pantry.

CAMPERS Lumberjack Eildon test

There are a lot of forward-fold campers on the market. And the majority are just variations of the same theme, but the Lumberjack Eildon is a camper with a defined difference; it has a deep tub with a traditional forward-fold Queen bed, while the back folds out to reveal a clever bunk, with the dinette converting into a double bed. All up, it’ll sleep five people, weighs in at 1660kg from the factory (220kg towball download) and lists at $30,999. Let’s get into this.

FULL HOUSE

WORDS AND IMAGES BY JOHN WILLIS

With a powered tent, in-built bunks and sleeping space for five people, the Lumberjack Eildon is an innovative camper in a crowded segment.

“In terms of safety, vision and looks, it’s hard to go past Clearview Powerfold Mirrors.”
Pat Callinan

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

What’s the outside like?
When it's all set up, the Eildon measures 5.5m(L) x 4.4m(W) meaning it’s got plenty of room for sleeping and relaxing if the weather keeps you indoors. When closed up for travel or storage, the Lumberjack Eildon measures 5.4m(L) x 2.1m(W) x 1.9m(H). The travel/storage height is a bit more than most forward-fold campers due to the deep tub allowing for greater fixed storage plus allowing for the folding frame and bunk components.

Out the front is a 100mm x 50mm x 4mm hot-dip galvanised drawbar and 3000kg 360-degree polyblock coupling. I was pleased to see the use of a premium ARK swing-up jockey wheel. There’s a tap for the 120-litre and 65-litre lockable water tanks that are well protected by bash plates, and all of the plumbing and wiring is neat, tidy and well insulated against damage from off-road travel. The drawbar also features a full-width stone guard with replaceable mesh ahead of the sizeable carpet-lined toolbox which holds two, nine-kilogram gas bottles and twin Jerry can holders.

The Eildon rides on 16-inch wheels rims with orange highlights (optional) to match the decals and hammertone black enamel paint. Underneath is Lumberjack’s own independent trailing arm suspension with coil springs and twin shocks plus 12-inch electric brakes with breakaway unit and handbrake. The Eildon has a quoted tare weight of 1660Kg as it leaves the factory dry and without accessories, and a towball weight of 220kg so take care when loading the trailer, especially the nose, to ensure you don’t exceed your vehicle’s towball download limit.

Around the back are twin spare wheels, large LED taillights, a gas outlet, two of the four swing-down stabilisers, and rated recovery points.

Externally there are five storage compartments including a dedicated space for storing the extra poles needed to apply final tensioning on the tent. There is a full-width compartment formed into the front of the tub that has a sliding tray either side with one pre-wired for a portable fridge. On the driver’s side is the battery compartment holding two deep-cycle batteries and to the rear is a compartment with the main isolator switch.

“It's a little fiddly, but with practice, I reckon you'll soon develop a system that allows you to halve the time it took me to set the whole thing up.”

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.
ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

Setting up camp
Once you have decided on your perfect campsite, levelled and stabilised the trailer, switch on the battery isolator, grab the remote, press GO, and the tent will then raise into place. The heavy lifting is all done by motors, but there's a little bit of fine adjustment work to do via extra poles to tension the bunk area. It's a little fiddly, but with practice, I reckon you'll soon develop a system that allows you to halve the time it took me to set the whole thing up.

One piece of advice is that the tent is very high, to allow for the bunks, and while this makes the whole thing feel nice and roomy, you will need to make sure you attach the awning roof before you raise the tent, or you’ll to carry a ladder to fit it after the fact.

The canvas work is of a high-quality 14oz material with a tropical roof that erects automatically on opening. The zips and midge-mesh flyscreens all seem good quality as does the general construction with double-stitched joins used throughout. There are plenty of windows plus a café-style opening on the living side of the camper expanding the social amenity. The large 4.9m(L) x 2.4m(W) annexe follows the high roofline and includes quick-release alloy poles, full PVC flooring and a complete set of sidewalls.

What’s the interior like?
The Queen bed sits immediately to the left, at the top of a folding staircase with a privacy screen. For those with bad knees, be warned, the step-up is high due to the height of the deep tub. This does, however, allow for three handy drawers on the open face.

To the right is the main control panel with individually fused lighting and electrical switches, voltmeter, the auto tent control and water tank gauge. There’s also the head unit for the CD/USB/Bluetooth sound system with dual interior speakers. The deep tub has allowed the opportunity for a pair of windows on either side of the U-shaped dinette, a nice touch but this is more for ventilation than light, I expect. The seats are well-padded and hide storage underneath. The collapsible table is finished in a timber laminate with a floating floor.

The top bunk is described as a king single and certainly has plenty of room for a good night sleep even for someone of my large dimensions, plus the convertible dinette converts into a double bed.

There are seven internal lights including LED strip lights, a step light as well as two external LED lights and five 12-volt outlets including the dedicated fridge socket to keep all of your electricals powered up, including the cost-optional TV that stores away under the seats.

Technically, the kitchen is outside. Lumberjack’s external kitchens have evolved into very efficient appliances. This stainless-steel unit slides out easily and stabilises with drop-down adjustable legs. It features a fold-back tray over the sink that forms added bench space combining with the sinks own draining board plus a pull-out extension. You can never have too much bench space. The functional kitchen has a four-burner stove with wok burner and wind guards plus there are two sliding utensils drawers and another two drop-in compartments behind the sink, but no pantry.

So, what do we think?
Lumberjack display its confidence in the Eildon by offering a five-year structural warranty and are available either via the showroom in Geelong, Victoria, or at outlets in Slacks Creek, Queensland and Cameron Caravans in South Australia. The Eildon is a truly innovative camper trailer with a layout that will appeal to many travellers, particularly those with larger families. It’s terrific to see competition driving exciting new concepts in this popular segment.

Lumberjack Eildon specifications
TARE 1660kg (as displayed)
ATM 2400 kg
SUSPENSION Independent trailing arm with twin shock absorbers and coil springs each side
BRAKES 12-inch electric with breakaway
COUPLING 3000 kg ADR-approved polyblock
DIMENSIONS (HITCH TO TAIL LIGHTS) L 5.4m x W 2.1m x H 1.9m
AWNING SIZE 4.9 x 2.4m
PRICE AS SHOWN $30,999 (+ORCS)
MORE INFO lumberjackcampertrailers.com.au

Pros
• Sophisticated electrics;
• Large living space; and
• Spacious useable outdoor kitchen.

Cons
• High step into the camper;
• Canvas needs drying ASAP if wet; and
• That we don’t own it.

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