VEHICLES

The Everest has just ticked over 3000km and it is running like an absolute dream. There were some initial concerns with the transmission becoming thumpy at low speeds and especially so in low-range. Something we also noticed with the Raptor’s 10-speed transmission on our comparison test between it and the Wrangler Rubicon. Although, the Raptor had around 7000km on the clock.

But, for the Everest, 2500km seems to have been the magic number. Even when I drive to try and catch the transmission out, I can’t. It’s smooth and refined, even when crawling about below 40km/h. And while we still haven’t been able to get the thing properly dirty, we did take it with us on our recent comparison test and it trundled along behind the other two; the only obstacle it didn’t tackle was the hillclimb.

Well, that’s not entirely true. We pointed the Everest at the hill but while the mechanicals were willing the tyres were not. The highway-oriented rubber is a real issue on slippery dirt unable to find any real grip and that was even with the pressures dropped.

2019 Ford Everest Titanium

We have three months with the Everest Titanium to find out if the bi-turbo engine, the seven-seat layout and its rough-road ability make it a must-buy for families.

Long-Term Review

What are we testing? The 2019 Ford Everest Titanium

Who's running it? Isaac Bober

Why are we testing it? To find out if the Everest is the best family rough roader wagon.

What it needs to do? While we’ve got the Everest, we want to find out if it can do it all, from the school run to the supermarket shop, to highway runs, towing and off-roading.

Survival of the fittest. That’s evolution. 

Introducing the HTX2, the natural development of the market-leading hybrid HTX. 

The best is obsolete. Better has evolved.

NEW HTX2 HYBRID DRIVING LIGHT

Australian-made • HID and LED technology • Rugged design

AVAILABLE FROM LEADING RETAILERS

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

So, from fast bitumen driving to water crossings and fast dirt roads, the Everest proved itself capable and comfortable. Unsealed 4X4’s editorial assistant, Josh, was in charge of the Everest, and here’s what he had to say:

“Loaded up with 4X4 recovery gear, a boot full of camera gear and two shooters, the Everest made short work of the drive from the office to our test location, out the back of Lithgow, NSW. The bi-turbo diesel engine and the 10-speed automatic transmission made it easy to keep up with and overtake traffic and the suspension tune, even on 20-inch alloys offered a plush ride.

“The two cars being compared were better set up to handle the tracks we were on, one had mud-terrain tyres and the other aggressive all-terrain rubber. But, the Everest on its 20s and road-oriented tyres followed everywhere the other two did with the exception of one technically challenging hillclimb; with better tyres I reckon the Everest would have made it up without too much drama.

“We already knew the Everest was good on-road; probably the best in the segment, but I’d never driven one off-road. First thing I noticed was the simplicity of changing into low-range. No longer do you need to put half your body weight through a lever to get it to engage, but instead a simple press of the button and away you go. The engine proved nice and strong when crawling at low speeds thanks to peak torque arriving at 1750rpm, but we noticed the 10-speed auto didn’t seem to enjoy being in low gears in low range when traversing steep tracks. We’ll spend some more time exploring this niggle over the coming weeks. Another observation was that the traction control seemed to allow a little too much wheelspin before grabbing the spinning wheel, but as we’ve noted before, better tyres would have probably fixed this as we probably wouldn’t have lost grip in the first place.

“In the end, after driving the Everest across dirt, gravel, rocks, up and down hills, and through rivers, one of the most impressive features was the fact it could do all of that and then provide passenger car-like levels of comfort once back on the highway. And you used to only really be able to say that about a Ranger Rover…”

In between, then and now, the weather has been bonkers and, just the other day we got a dumping of snow up where I live (Blue Mountains, NSW). Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get out in the snow for a play; it started raining and washed it all away.

"Loaded up with 4X4 recovery gear, a boot full of camera gear and two shooters, the Everest made short work of the drive from the office to our test location, out the back of Lithgow, NSW"

As I write this, I’ve just hopped out of our long-term Suzuki Jimny and back into the Everest. What a difference between the two. Sure, there’s a huge cost difference between the two and one’s a four-seater tiny-tot and the other’s a seven-seater wagon, but it was nice to be reminded of just how comfortable the Everest truly is. Given it’s based off the Ranger, a work-oriented pickup, albeit with a different rear-end, the Everest feels more like a passenger-vehicle oriented SUV. The ride and handling really is first-class and there is nothing else in the segment that is as much fun to drive.

But let’s have a closer look at the interior. In the past, I’ve had issues with the quality of the fit and finish in some Everest I’ve tested. Mainly this has been with the seats and most noticeably in leather-equipped vehicles and especially around the seat release mechanism on the second-row seat shoulders. Maybe it’s because our Everest hasn’t copped much abuse but the interior’s still looking pretty good although I have noticed that the plastic marks very easily, especially the stuff in the boot.

And I’m not a fan, at all, of the automatic high-beam. These things seem to have a mind of their own. Yes, I know how they work, via the light sensor up on the windscreen, and I’m careful to make sure it’s always clean. But the way the lights operate is inconsistent. See, occasionally they’ll respond to reflections on road signs and not an oncoming vehicle. At other times they’ll swap between main and high-beam like a strobe light, confused by whatever light the sensor is picking up.

So, the auto high-beam function is annoying, but the light thrown by the high beams is not. The spread is nice and wide, illuminating the road sides (and I will get a picture of this) allowing you to see if there are any critters by the side of the road. Sure, they’re not as good running extra lights but in lieu of them they’re pretty darn good.

Now, let’s see if we can get new tyres on the Everest before the next update. In the meantime, follow our weekly updates by clicking HERE.

2019 Ford Everest Titanium Specifications
Price: From $73,990+ORC
Warranty: Five-years, unlimited kilometres
Service: Intervals 12 months, 15,000km
Safety: Five-star ANCAP (2105)
Engine: 2.0-litre bi-turbo four-cylinder diesel
Power: 157kW at 3750rpm
Torque: 500Nm from 1750-2000rpm
Transmission: 10-speed automatic
Drive: All-wheel drive with low-range
Dimensions: 4649mm long, 2180mm wide (with mirrors), 1837mm high, 2850mm wheelbase
Ground Clearance: 225mm measured
Angles: 29.5-degrees approach, 25-degrees departure, 21.5-degrees rampover
Wading: 800mm
Weight: 2446kg (fuel, no driver)
GVM: 3100kg
GCM: 5900kg
Towing: 3100kg
Boot Size: 450-2010L (loaded to the roof)
Spare: Full-size underslung
Fuel Tank: 80L
Thirst: 7.1L/100km claimed (7.9L/100km tested)

VEHICLES

What are we testing? The 2019 Ford Everest Titanium

Who's running it? Isaac Bober

Why are we testing it? To find out if the Everest is the best family rough roader wagon.

What it needs to do? While we’ve got the Everest, we want to find out if it can do it all, from the school run to the supermarket shop, to highway runs, towing and off-roading.

The Everest has just ticked over 3000km and it is running like an absolute dream. There were some initial concerns with the transmission becoming thumpy at low speeds and especially so in low-range. Something we also noticed with the Raptor’s 10-speed transmission on our comparison test between it and the Wrangler Rubicon. Although, the Raptor had around 7000km on the clock.

But, for the Everest, 2500km seems to have been the magic number. Even when I drive to try and catch the transmission out, I can’t. It’s smooth and refined, even when crawling about below 40km/h. And while we still haven’t been able to get the thing properly dirty, we did take it with us on our recent comparison test and it trundled along behind the other two; the only obstacle it didn’t tackle was the hillclimb.

Well, that’s not entirely true. We pointed the Everest at the hill but while the mechanicals were willing the tyres were not. The highway-oriented rubber is a real issue on slippery dirt unable to find any real grip and that was even with the pressures dropped.

2019 Ford Everest Titanium

We have three months with the Everest Titanium to find out if the bi-turbo engine, the seven-seat layout and its rough-road ability make it a must-buy for families.

Long-Term Review

Survival of the fittest. That’s evolution. 

Introducing the HTX2, the natural development of the market-leading hybrid HTX. 

The best is obsolete. Better has evolved.

NEW HTX2 HYBRID DRIVING LIGHT

Australian-made • HID and LED technology • Rugged design

AVAILABLE FROM LEADING RETAILERS

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

So, from fast bitumen driving to water crossings and fast dirt roads, the Everest proved itself capable and comfortable. Unsealed 4X4’s editorial assistant, Josh, was in charge of the Everest, and here’s what he had to say:

“Loaded up with 4X4 recovery gear, a boot full of camera gear and two shooters, the Everest made short work of the drive from the office to our test location, out the back of Lithgow, NSW. The bi-turbo diesel engine and the 10-speed automatic transmission made it easy to keep up with and overtake traffic and the suspension tune, even on 20-inch alloys offered a plush ride.

“The two cars being compared were better set up to handle the tracks we were on, one had mud-terrain tyres and the other aggressive all-terrain rubber. But, the Everest on its 20s and road-oriented tyres followed everywhere the other two did with the exception of one technically challenging hillclimb; with better tyres I reckon the Everest would have made it up without too much drama.

“We already knew the Everest was good on-road; probably the best in the segment, but I’d never driven one off-road. First thing I noticed was the simplicity of changing into low-range. No longer do you need to put half your body weight through a lever to get it to engage, but instead a simple press of the button and away you go. The engine proved nice and strong when crawling at low speeds thanks to peak torque arriving at 1750rpm, but we noticed the 10-speed auto didn’t seem to enjoy being in low gears in low range when traversing steep tracks. We’ll spend some more time exploring this niggle over the coming weeks. Another observation was that the traction control seemed to allow a little too much wheelspin before grabbing the spinning wheel, but as we’ve noted before, better tyres would have probably fixed this as we probably wouldn’t have lost grip in the first place.

“In the end, after driving the Everest across dirt, gravel, rocks, up and down hills, and through rivers, one of the most impressive features was the fact it could do all of that and then provide passenger car-like levels of comfort once back on the highway. And you used to only really be able to say that about a Ranger Rover…”

In between, then and now, the weather has been bonkers and, just the other day we got a dumping of snow up where I live (Blue Mountains, NSW). Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get out in the snow for a play; it started raining and washed it all away.

"Loaded up with 4X4 recovery gear, a boot full of camera gear and two shooters, the Everest made short work of the drive from the office to our test location, out the back of Lithgow, NSW"

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

As I write this, I’ve just hopped out of our long-term Suzuki Jimny and back into the Everest. What a difference between the two. Sure, there’s a huge cost difference between the two and one’s a four-seater tiny-tot and the other’s a seven-seater wagon, but it was nice to be reminded of just how comfortable the Everest truly is. Given it’s based off the Ranger, a work-oriented pickup, albeit with a different rear-end, the Everest feels more like a passenger-vehicle oriented SUV. The ride and handling really is first-class and there is nothing else in the segment that is as much fun to drive.

But let’s have a closer look at the interior. In the past, I’ve had issues with the quality of the fit and finish in some Everest I’ve tested. Mainly this has been with the seats and most noticeably in leather-equipped vehicles and especially around the seat release mechanism on the second-row seat shoulders. Maybe it’s because our Everest hasn’t copped much abuse but the interior’s still looking pretty good although I have noticed that the plastic marks very easily, especially the stuff in the boot.

And I’m not a fan, at all, of the automatic high-beam. These things seem to have a mind of their own. Yes, I know how they work, via the light sensor up on the windscreen, and I’m careful to make sure it’s always clean. But the way the lights operate is inconsistent. See, occasionally they’ll respond to reflections on road signs and not an oncoming vehicle. At other times they’ll swap between main and high-beam like a strobe light, confused by whatever light the sensor is picking up.

So, the auto high-beam function is annoying, but the light thrown by the high beams is not. The spread is nice and wide, illuminating the road sides (and I will get a picture of this) allowing you to see if there are any critters by the side of the road. Sure, they’re not as good running extra lights but in lieu of them they’re pretty darn good.

Now, let’s see if we can get new tyres on the Everest before the next update. In the meantime, follow our weekly updates by clicking HERE.

2019 Ford Everest Titanium Specifications
Price: From $73,990+ORC
Warranty: Five-years, unlimited kilometres
Service: Intervals 12 months, 15,000km
Safety: Five-star ANCAP (2105)
Engine: 2.0-litre bi-turbo four-cylinder diesel
Power: 157kW at 3750rpm
Torque: 500Nm from 1750-2000rpm
Transmission: 10-speed automatic
Drive: All-wheel drive with low-range
Dimensions: 4649mm long, 2180mm wide (with mirrors), 1837mm high, 2850mm wheelbase
Ground Clearance: 225mm measured
Angles: 29.5-degrees approach, 25-degrees departure, 21.5-degrees rampover
Wading: 800mm
Weight: 2446kg (fuel, no driver)
GVM: 3100kg
GCM: 5900kg
Towing: 3100kg
Boot Size: 450-2010L (loaded to the roof)
Spare: Full-size underslung
Fuel Tank: 80L
Thirst: 7.1L/100km claimed (7.9L/100km tested)

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