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GEAR Tyre deflator comparison: Part 2

MEGA TYRE DEFLATOR

COMPARISON

WES’ THOUGHTS ON THE RESULTS
At the end of the day, you’ve got the data to look over in the table. These here are just my musings and thoughts on the different deflators we ended up testing.

I think there were two, maybe three distinct groups in this test. The high-end deflators – ARB, TJM and Ironman 4X4, the low-end deflator – Adventure Kings and the mid-range deflators – pretty much everything else. Mind you, these groups are based purely on build quality that I noticed and how they feel to put hands on them. There are also the materials used, insofar as the hose connectors, whether spring or crush fitting, sheath over the hose, quality of brass in the actual deflator, and the build tolerances. Price, however, does not play a part in how I have put them in each group. Especially seeing as the Ridge Ryder was way up there in price at $65, and the TJM was rather well priced at $50.

For me, the ARB and TJM (funnily enough being the two ‘big-brands’) would be my personal preference. Simply due to build quality, and that around $50-70 will get you a top-quality deflator that you know you can trust. If you’re halfway across The Simmo, you really don’t want your deflator giving up the ghost because you cheaped-out on a reasonably critical bit of gear, and your valve core buggers off into the sand never to be seen again. You’re not going to have a good time.

That said, if you just need the bare essentials, and don’t go touring too far from home without mates, a cheaper option may be up your alley. I guess it comes down to your own personal needs, what you’re after and what sort of budget you can justify for a deflator. Just remember, as you’ll see in the table and the videos in this article, that price isn’t always an indicator of quality.

WORDS AND IMAGES BY WES WHITWORTH

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THE DATA AND THE WINNERS

*non-core valve removal deflator.

**Control values are from the calibrated BluePoint Tyre Gauge which we have used as an accurate gauge to measure the deflators against.

OVERALL RESULTS

6.6/10 BUSHRANGER 4X4 GEAR

7/10 ADVENTURE KINGS

7.6/10 DIRECTION PLUS

7.8/10 80 OUTDOORS

8/10 IRONMAN 4X4

8.8/10 TJM

7.4/10 XTM 4X4 ACCESSORIES (BCF)

7.6/10 ROADSAFE 4WD

6.6/10 RIDGE RYDER (SUPERCHEAP AUTO)

8.6/10 ARB

5/10 DR AIR (ANACONDA)

4.8/10 THE HUMBLE STICK (RANDOM TREE)

WINNER!

*Terms and conditions apply
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READ THE REVIEW IN UNSEALED 4X4

How to use a tyre deflator
Chances are you know how to use one. Even if you don’t you probably won’t admit it. Either way, this is how you use one without stuffing it all up (you’re welcome).

As you’d expect, attach the business end to your tyre valve. It screws around the outside, usually down to the where the brass of your tyre valve meets the rubber. Once that’s secure and reasonably tight (don’t over tighten it!), you’ll want to push the centre pin/rod in, and while holding pressure in (towards the valve), slowly begin to rotate counter-clockwise (Lefty Loosie!)), the nub on the end of the rod.

As you begin to undo it, you should feel it ‘click’, which is the slot on the end of the rod seating onto the valve core. You should feel a bit of resistance as you actually begin to undo the core. Keep undoing the core (usually somewhere between 6-10 turns), and you’ll feel it click as you’re turning it. This is the valve core going past the end of the thread, which tells you you’re done. Let pressure off the rod, it should push outward toward you, and you’re done.

To deflate, just pull the big bit of brass (with the hose attached to it) backwards and it’ll start letting air out. To stop the air, push that big bit forward. You’ll need to have it stopped/forward to take a reading of where your tyres are at.

To get it back in, essentially do the reverse of the above. Push the rod forward toward the wheel/valve, and start turning it clockwise (Righty Tighty!) making sure you’re keeping pressure on the rod as you’re turning it (otherwise it won’t be tightening the valve, just spinning in the air). Keep going until you feel it tighten up. Once it’s tight, keep a bit of pressure as if you’re still tightening it, then pull on the rod, so as to not loosen off the valve core. You should be able to pull back on the big brass bit (with the hose coming out of it), and no air should escape (not even a whisper!). Once you’ve got that done and you’re happy, slowly unscrew the initial part you screwed onto the tyre valve, making sure the centre rod is pulled out. There, done.

GEAR Tyre deflator comparison: Part 2

MEGA TYRE DEFLATOR

COMPARISON

WORDS AND IMAGES BY WES WHITWORTH

WES’ THOUGHTS ON THE RESULTS
At the end of the day, you’ve got the data to look over in the table. These here are just my musings and thoughts on the different deflators we ended up testing.

I think there were two, maybe three distinct groups in this test. The high-end deflators – ARB, TJM and Ironman 4X4, the low-end deflator – Adventure Kings and the mid-range deflators – pretty much everything else. Mind you, these groups are based purely on build quality that I noticed and how they feel to put hands on them. There are also the materials used, insofar as the hose connectors, whether spring or crush fitting, sheath over the hose, quality of brass in the actual deflator, and the build tolerances. Price, however, does not play a part in how I have put them in each group. Especially seeing as the Ridge Ryder was way up there in price at $65, and the TJM was rather well priced at $50.

For me, the ARB and TJM (funnily enough being the two ‘big-brands’) would be my personal preference. Simply due to build quality, and that around $50-70 will get you a top-quality deflator that you know you can trust. If you’re halfway across The Simmo, you really don’t want your deflator giving up the ghost because you cheaped-out on a reasonably critical bit of gear, and your valve core buggers off into the sand never to be seen again. You’re not going to have a good time.

That said, if you just need the bare essentials, and don’t go touring too far from home without mates, a cheaper option may be up your alley. I guess it comes down to your own personal needs, what you’re after and what sort of budget you can justify for a deflator. Just remember, as you’ll see in the table and the videos in this article, that price isn’t always an indicator of quality.

SCROLL TO CONTINUE
ADVERTISEMENT

THE DATA AND THE WINNERS

*non-core valve removal deflator.

**Control values are from the calibrated BluePoint Tyre Gauge which we have used as an accurate gauge to measure the deflators against.

OVERALL RESULTS

6.6/10 BUSHRANGER 4X4 GEAR

7/10 ADVENTURE KINGS

7.6/10 DIRECTION PLUS

7.8/10 80 OUTDOORS

8/10 IRONMAN 4X4

WINNER!

8.8/10 TJM

7.4/10 XTM 4X4 ACCESSORIES (BCF)

7.6/10 ROADSAFE 4WD

6.6/10 RIDGE RYDER (SUPERCHEAP AUTO)

8.6/10 ARB

5/10 DR AIR (ANACONDA)

4.8/10 THE HUMBLE STICK (RANDOM TREE)

*Terms and conditions apply

READ THE REVIEW IN UNSEALED 4X4

SCROLL TO CONTINUE
ADVERTISEMENT

How to use a tyre deflator
Chances are you know how to use one. Even if you don’t you probably won’t admit it. Either way, this is how you use one without stuffing it all up (you’re welcome).

As you’d expect, attach the business end to your tyre valve. It screws around the outside, usually down to the where the brass of your tyre valve meets the rubber. Once that’s secure and reasonably tight (don’t over tighten it!), you’ll want to push the centre pin/rod in, and while holding pressure in (towards the valve), slowly begin to rotate counter-clockwise (Lefty Loosie!)), the nub on the end of the rod.

As you begin to undo it, you should feel it ‘click’, which is the slot on the end of the rod seating onto the valve core. You should feel a bit of resistance as you actually begin to undo the core. Keep undoing the core (usually somewhere between 6-10 turns), and you’ll feel it click as you’re turning it. This is the valve core going past the end of the thread, which tells you you’re done. Let pressure off the rod, it should push outward toward you, and you’re done.

To deflate, just pull the big bit of brass (with the hose attached to it) backwards and it’ll start letting air out. To stop the air, push that big bit forward. You’ll need to have it stopped/forward to take a reading of where your tyres are at.

To get it back in, essentially do the reverse of the above. Push the rod forward toward the wheel/valve, and start turning it clockwise (Righty Tighty!) making sure you’re keeping pressure on the rod as you’re turning it (otherwise it won’t be tightening the valve, just spinning in the air). Keep going until you feel it tighten up. Once it’s tight, keep a bit of pressure as if you’re still tightening it, then pull on the rod, so as to not loosen off the valve core. You should be able to pull back on the big brass bit (with the hose coming out of it), and no air should escape (not even a whisper!). Once you’ve got that done and you’re happy, slowly unscrew the initial part you screwed onto the tyre valve, making sure the centre rod is pulled out. There, done.