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Mitsubishi utes have a long history in Australia, which is one of the reasons the modern Triton is still considered a viable alternative to the dual-cab establishment. Plenty of folks get the warm-and-fuzzies over the old Express ute they owned decades ago while those with any of the last couple of generations of Triton utes seem pretty happy with them, too.

The new-ish MQ model which debuted here in 2015 seems to be continuing that tradition. The dual-cab four-wheel-drive layout is the most popular variant; indeed in September 2019, Triton (MQ and MR) was the second best-selling 4X4 in the country. And despite some initial concerns over the relatively small-capacity turbo-diesel engine, the MQ appears to have proven itself as more than worthy.

Throw in the fact that it's immensely good value compared with the rest of the big-name players, and you have yourself a recipe for keeping consumers happy. As with any late-model off-road pickup, there are things you should be aware of, as well as the fixes for those things. Here's the skinny on the MQ Triton in terms of what you might need to address and how to do it.

WORDS BY DAVE MORLEY, IMAGES BY ARNOLD ARCHIVE

The current Mitsubishi Triton is one of the best-selling 4X4s in the country but it and its predecessor (MQ) are not immune to things like valve clearances and shocks failing. Here’s what you need to know.

Mitsubishi Triton MQ

 Common problems and solutions 

VEHICLES

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SCROLL TO CONTINUE

Intake clogging
The Triton is like other diesel four-wheel drives, and so you need to be aware of the potential for a build-up of black gunk in the intake manifold and the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve. Fundamentally, you've got two emissions-control measures that, in isolation, cause no harm but, when you combine them under the same bonnet, can lead to chaos and big repair bills.

The first part of the phenomenon is the EGR function whereby the engine swallows a percentage of its exhaust gasses to clean them up (by burning them twice). Nothing wrong with that. Neither is there anything philosophically wrong with making sure the gasses that build up inside the crankcase (not inconsiderable in a turbo-motor) don't just vent to the atmosphere, either.

It's when you combine those two functions and their by-products – the soot from the recirculated exhaust and the oily gasses from the crankcase – and mix them that you can have a problem. And when you see what a nasty, sticky, gloopy, horrible mess this combination of soot and oil makes, you can see why having it plastered all over your intake manifold and inside the EGR valve is such a problem.

Eventually, you'll get reduced performance (because the engine can't breathe) a check-engine light (because the EGR valve is blocked) and all sorts of rough running, hard starting and poor idling issues.

problem
solution

In extreme cases, you'll need to disassemble the intake side of the engine, manually clean it and put it back together. Along the way, you can try to clean out the EGR valve, but most workshops reckon you'll wind up replacing it.

A lot of places we talked to reckon you can use an aerosol product that gives the intake manifold and its plumbing a quick, chemical pull-through. The trick is you need to use it every service as it can only keep a lid on things, it's not a rebuild-in-a-can product. If your engine is too far down the road to being clogged up, you're back to square one.

You can test the EGR valve to see if it's still functioning, but if it's stuck open, you're most probably looking down the barrel of a new valve assembly.

Some folks will tell you the best thing to do is disable the EGR valve by blocking it off. That stops the soot from mixing with the oil-fumes, but it's illegal to tamper with the emissions controls on a motor vehicle, so you're leaving yourself open to lots of legal and potential insurance hassles. Not to mention what Mitsubishi would do with your warranty if there's a claim down the track.

A better idea is to fit an air-oil-separator which, as the name suggests, separates the oil from the crankcase fumes before the fumes are sucked back into the engine. It's not uncommon for the separator to have up to several hundred millilitres of oil in it at each service, and that's the oil that would otherwise be turning the soot into crud inside your intake.

An oil-separator differs from a simple catch-can system because it can physically separate the oil from the gasses, so you need a specialised kit to do it.

Chassis cracking
Let's start by saying the Triton is not the only dual-cab ute to have experienced catastrophic chassis failures in recent years. No doubt you've seen the photos all over social media of cars with broken backs. But what's causing it?

Two things, mainly. The first is that some owners continue to operate their vehicles in an overloaded or poorly loaded state. There's a reason that manufacturers apply a payload and towing limit to their vehicles, and ignoring those limits is a great way to come unstuck in the middle of nowhere.

The second cause is down to modified suspension systems and, from what we can gather, it's aftermarket air-bag systems (deemed necessary because the payload is often exceeded) that are the main culprits. Essentially, placing an air-bag where it can act on the part of the chassis not designed to take such a load is a brilliant way to break things.

In something like the Triton with its leaf rear springs, the chassis is beefed up around the mounting points for those springs because that's where the load is anticipated to bear. But an aftermarket air-bag which bolts right on top of the axle and then mounts to the chassis rail (pretty much exactly half-way between those strengthened spring-hanger points) is a real chance to over-stress that section of the chassis with the result that it'll bend. And then cracks. Towing a big van or camper trailer at high speed over rough terrain is another good way to experience the same joys of a broken chassis.

problem
solution

Done right, you can increase the GVM and towing capacity of your rig, but it's important to use a system that has been designed for that exact vehicle and is the work of somebody who understands the engineering and load paths involved. And more importantly, the rules and regulations of the state or territory in which you reside.

Don't forget either, that a Triton 4X4 dual-cab ute starts with a 3000kg braked-trailer towing limit, rather than the 3500kg that some of its competitors claim. That's not to accuse the Triton of being underdone, but it does reflect the fact that there are limits to what these trucks can do and that their manufacturers know as much. That said, the Triton is one of the only towing platforms that can tow at its maximum and still maintain a healthy portion of its payload.

For a lot of folks, a taller, stiffer rear spring is probably going to be all the upgrade they need for most applications. Yes, air-bags are sexy, but you have to ask yourself if maybe the more straightforward, cheaper re-set rear spring isn't all you need in the first place. And think about how you load the vehicle rather than just chucking everything on board and hitting the key. Try to keep heavier stuff between the axles and be aware that the Triton has a lot of rear overhang, so placing gear at the back means the load-force is cantilevered off the chassis rails. But it's not on its own in this regard.

If you do go for air-bags, make sure the kit takes into account those new load paths and includes either extra bracing or a reinforced spring pad to help prevent chassis problems down the track. That way you'll have all the ride levelling benefits and side-to-side ride-height compensation without the worry of having something go crack in the night.

What you might find, though, is that your preferred workshop doesn't want to know about air-bags. Some we spoke to will (politely) refuse to fit them for all the above reasons.

The combination of the Drivetech 4x4 Dual Speed Winch and Front Bumper by Rival creates a perfect partnership that’s as sexy as it is functional.

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

Valve clearances
The Triton's turbo-diesel uses a shim-and-bucket method of creating the correct valve clearance, and these need checking every 30,000km. That's not the problem per se; rather, it's that a lot of mechanics will rely on checking 'by ear' to complete this task. That might have been okay on your grandad's grey-motored Holden, but it doesn't cut it with a modern turbo-diesel.

Running an engine with incorrect valve clearances can lead to valve and upper-cylinder damage, and while it's not something that should require a full re-set every 30,000km, you might find that one or two clearances will need to be adjusted each time. That will increase as the engine wears and the clearances become more inclined to adjust themselves in-service.

Don't forget, too, that the 4N15 engine in the Triton features variable valve timing, making correct clearances even more critical to the way it runs and its emissions.

problem
solution

Find a mechanic who knows what they're doing and won't fob you off with an 'I checked it by ear' explanation when the bill is handed over. Modern common-rail diesels are inherently noisy (mainly the injectors), and this makes it extremely difficult to accurately judge valve clearances just by listening.

We've heard of some dealerships that will do a 'by-ear' check while the vehicle is under warranty and then stick you for the bigger bill of actually checking the valves properly once the warranty is up. Since the MQ Triton is still under warranty, that's something to take up with the service manager when you drop the vehicle off.

You can't modify anything to get around this. Valve clearances change as components wear and the engine ages. But keeping on top of the maintenance will ensure that even if the clearances do change, they won't go to hell all of a sudden.

Plenty of oil and filter changes are the best way to protect an engine internally as well as making sure the intake is sealed from dust and water.

Shock failures
Maybe it's to do with the fact the Triton is somewhat stiffly suspended, or perhaps (more likely) it's due to the vehicle being built down to a price bracket that Mitsubishi's suppliers must work within, but whatever the reason, the vehicle seems to wear out its OE shock absorbers pretty quickly.

The fronts seem the first to go, probably because the leaf-sprung rear end is partly self-damping (thanks to the friction between the individual leaves). Still, after a relatively short time, the rears will become mushy and allow the vehicle to bounce around more than it should.

problem
solution

You can certainly talk to Mitsubishi about this if the shocks fail within the warranty period. That said, dampers are a wearing part – like brake pads, for instance – and there's an expectation they'll require replacement at some point. Whether you can convince your dealer your shocks have failed prematurely rather than simply in the name of acceptable wear-and-tear is the big question.

Given the OE dampers seem a bit underdone, the change you can make at the first damper-change point is to fit some better quality units. If you're sticking with the standard springs, a good quality set of dampers won't break the bank, and there are plenty around. Be guided by your workshop's recommendations and go for a known brand-name rather than something from an online seller who could be flogging any old rubbish.

If the budget allows and you want to go a bit radical, there are quite a few choices now in aftermarket by-pass shocks that were developed for off-road racing but are increasingly finding their way on to touring rigs that are often heavily loaded. These dampers are high-end pieces of gear and often include technology such as remote reservoirs and quality fittings. They're not cheap, though, and to maximise their effect, upgrading the springs at the same time makes sense.

Seeing in the dark
It has always amazed us that some manufacturers completely ignore lighting when they design a new vehicle. Enough people have complained about the Triton’s standard headlights, that this is worth a mention here. Interestingly, the facelift for 2019 of the Triton incorporates LED lights for both low and high beam, making us suspect Mitsubishi has reacted to this criticism.

problem
solution

Unfortunately, the new, facelifted lights can't be retro-fitted to the original MQ model, so you need to work with what you already have.

Lighting upgrades aren't uncommon in the world of modern vehicles, and there are many ways to go here. You can upgrade the existing headlights with more powerful globes, or add auxiliary lights that operate on high-beam to give you a much better view down the road.

Adding a more powerful globe is okay provided you don't exceed the maximum amount of heat the light housings and lenses (which are now almost always polycarbonate) can handle. Overdo it, and you can start melting bits and pieces, and that can lead to light failure when you need it least. If you do go for an upgrade, it might be wise to find a kit with an upgraded wiring loom, too, so that the replacement lights get enough power.

The hot-tip mod for most folks is to add an LED light bar which gives high-beam a big leg up. But not all light bars are created equal, and some of the imported, cheaper ones are pretty lame. Go for a name-brand and make sure it's wired up and earthed properly to avoid stray-current dramas that can – believe it or not – start to eat away at aluminium components like radiator cores. And even though LED lights draw less than conventional globes, the best advice is to run the light bar through a relay to avoid overheating the car's wiring and to ensure the full potential of the LEDs is unleashed.

And while LEDs are suitable, they generally provide a spreading light and don't reach as far down the road as a good set of conventional 100-Watt spotlights. You might also find that an LED light bar creates a lot of glare in areas where there are reflective road signs. So make sure you can isolate the light bar via a switch (which is a legal requirement anyway). Beyond that, the biggest problem is that switching from an aftermarket high-beam to a standard low-beam might convince you that you've gone momentarily blind.

Radio ga-ga
It won't bother you when you're dropping into Gunshot on the Old Telegraph Track, but when the modern four-wheel-drive is so much more than just a weekend warrior these days, the poor quality of the Triton's standard stereo system might annoy you.

People who own them reckon the Triton's stereo is one area where you can really see how it's been built down to a price, with scratchy reception and tinny speakers the main complaints.

problem
solution

There are plenty of aftermarket stereo solutions out there, so choosing one becomes a matter of balancing the sound you want with the budget you have in mind. Remember that the Triton's standard unit is a double-DIN fitment, so you need to buy a replacement that is tailored to the vehicle. While you're at it, you can also add front and rear cameras and all sorts of connectivity the standard car doesn't have.

The trickiest bit is finding a front speaker that fits thanks to the design of the standard speakers which incorporate the speaker unit into a plastic mounting arrangement. But our experts reckon a replacement speaker can be used with an aftermarket spacer-ring and everything goes back together just peachy.

Who's knocking?
Another minor one in the bigger scheme of things, but many owners have told us that one of the things that continues to annoy them day in, day out is a tapping noise from the passenger’s seat-belt tapping on the B-pillar trim. Apparently, every time the Triton hits a bump, the metal catch of the seat-belt clacks against the plastic pillar-trim. It sounds petty, but lesser things have driven grown men (and women) mad over the years.

problem
solution

One of those self-adhesive Velcro patches (the soft, fuzzy half) stuck to the pillar seems to do the trick. It doesn’t stop the belt buckle hitting the B-pillar, but it does muffle the racket. That’ll do.

VEHICLES

Mitsubishi utes have a long history in Australia, which is one of the reasons the modern Triton is still considered a viable alternative to the dual-cab establishment. Plenty of folks get the warm-and-fuzzies over the old Express ute they owned decades ago while those with any of the last couple of generations of Triton utes seem pretty happy with them, too.

The new-ish MQ model which debuted here in 2015 seems to be continuing that tradition. The dual-cab four-wheel-drive layout is the most popular variant; indeed in September 2019, Triton (MQ and MR) was the second best-selling 4X4 in the country. And despite some initial concerns over the relatively small-capacity turbo-diesel engine, the MQ appears to have proven itself as more than worthy.

Throw in the fact that it's immensely good value compared with the rest of the big-name players, and you have yourself a recipe for keeping consumers happy. As with any late-model off-road pickup, there are things you should be aware of, as well as the fixes for those things. Here's the skinny on the MQ Triton in terms of what you might need to address and how to do it.

The current Mitsubishi Triton is one of the best-selling 4X4s in the country but it and its predecessor (MQ) are not immune to things like valve clearances and shocks failing. Here’s what you need to know.

WORDS BY DAVE MORLEY, IMAGES BY ARNOLD ARCHIVE

Mitsubishi Triton MQ

 Common problems and solutions 

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

Intake clogging
The Triton is like other diesel four-wheel drives, and so you need to be aware of the potential for a build-up of black gunk in the intake manifold and the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve. Fundamentally, you've got two emissions-control measures that, in isolation, cause no harm but, when you combine them under the same bonnet, can lead to chaos and big repair bills.

The first part of the phenomenon is the EGR function whereby the engine swallows a percentage of its exhaust gasses to clean them up (by burning them twice). Nothing wrong with that. Neither is there anything philosophically wrong with making sure the gasses that build up inside the crankcase (not inconsiderable in a turbo-motor) don't just vent to the atmosphere, either.

It's when you combine those two functions and their by-products – the soot from the recirculated exhaust and the oily gasses from the crankcase – and mix them that you can have a problem. And when you see what a nasty, sticky, gloopy, horrible mess this combination of soot and oil makes, you can see why having it plastered all over your intake manifold and inside the EGR valve is such a problem.

Eventually, you'll get reduced performance (because the engine can't breathe) a check-engine light (because the EGR valve is blocked) and all sorts of rough running, hard starting and poor idling issues.

problem
solution

In extreme cases, you'll need to disassemble the intake side of the engine, manually clean it and put it back together. Along the way, you can try to clean out the EGR valve, but most workshops reckon you'll wind up replacing it.

A lot of places we talked to reckon you can use an aerosol product that gives the intake manifold and its plumbing a quick, chemical pull-through. The trick is you need to use it every service as it can only keep a lid on things, it’s not a rebuild-in-a-can product. If your engine is too far down the road to being clogged up, you’re back to square one.

You can test the EGR valve to see if it’s still functioning, but if it’s stuck open, you’re most probably looking down the barrel of a new valve assembly.

Some folks will tell you the best thing to do is disable the EGR valve by blocking it off. That stops the soot from mixing with the oil-fumes, but it's illegal to tamper with the emissions controls on a motor vehicle, so you're leaving yourself open to lots of legal and potential insurance hassles. Not to mention what Mitsubishi would do with your warranty if there’s a claim down the track.

A better idea is to fit an air-oil-separator which, as the name suggests, separates the oil from the crankcase fumes before the fumes are sucked back into the engine. Apparently, it’s not uncommon for the separator to have up to several hundred millilitres of oil in it at each service, and that's the oil that would otherwise be turning the soot into crud inside your intake.

An oil-separator differs from a simple catch-can system because it can physically separate the oil from the gasses, so you need a specialised kit to do it.

Chassis cracking
Let's start by saying the Triton is not the only dual-cab ute to have experienced catastrophic chassis failures in recent years. No doubt you've seen the photos all over social media of cars with broken backs. But what's causing it?

Two things, mainly. The first is that some owners continue to operate their vehicles in an overloaded or poorly loaded state. There’s a reason that manufacturers apply a payload and towing limit to their vehicles, and ignoring those limits is a great way to come unstuck in the middle of nowhere.

The second cause is down to modified suspension systems and, from what we can gather, it's aftermarket air-bag systems (deemed necessary because the payload is often exceeded) that are the main culprits. Essentially, placing an air-bag where it can act on the part of the chassis not designed to take such a load is a brilliant way to break things.

In something like the Triton with its leaf rear springs, the chassis is beefed up around the mounting points for those springs because that's where the load is anticipated to bear. But an aftermarket air-bag which bolts right on top of the axle and then mounts to the chassis rail (pretty much exactly half-way between those strengthened spring-hanger points) is a real chance to overstress that section of the chassis with the result that it'll bend. And then cracks. Towing a big van or camper trailer at high speed over rough terrain is another good way to experience the same joys of a broken chassis.

problem
solution

Done right, you can increase the GVM and towing capacity of your rig, but it's important to use a system that has been designed for that exact vehicle and is the work of somebody who understands the engineering and load paths involved. And more importantly, the rules and regulations of the state or territory in which you reside.

Don't forget either, that a Triton 4X4 dual-cab ute starts with a 3000kg braked-trailer towing limit, rather than the 3500kg that some of its competitors claim. That’s not to accuse the Mitsubishi of being underdone, but it does reflect the fact that there are limits to what these trucks can do and that their manufacturers know as much. That said, the Triton is one of the only towing platforms that can tow at its maximum and still maintain a healthy portion of its payload.

For a lot of folks, a taller, stiffer rear spring is probably going to be all the upgrade they need for most applications. Yes, air-bags are sexy, but you have to ask yourself if maybe the more straightforward, cheaper re-set rear spring isn't all you need in the first place. And think about how you load the vehicle rather than just chucking everything on board and hitting the key. Try to keep heavier stuff between the axles and be aware that the Triton has a lot of rear overhang, so placing gear at the back means the load-force is cantilevered off the chassis rails. But it's not on its own in this regard.

If you do go for air-bags, make sure the kit takes into account those new load paths and includes either extra bracing or a reinforced spring pad to help prevent chassis problems down the track. That way you’ll have all the ride levelling benefits and side-to-side ride-height compensation without the worry of having something go crack in the night.

What you might find, though, is that your preferred workshop doesn’t want to know about air-bags. Some we spoke to will (politely) refuse to fit them for all the above reasons.

The combination of the Drivetech 4x4 Dual Speed Winch and Front Bumper by Rival creates a perfect partnership that’s as sexy as it is functional.

ADVERTISEMENT
SCROLL TO CONTINUE

Valve clearances
The Triton's turbo-diesel uses a shim-and-bucket method of creating the correct valve clearance, and these need checking every 30,000km. That's not the problem per se; rather, it's that a lot of mechanics will rely on checking 'by ear' to complete this task. That might have been okay on your grandad's grey-motored Holden, but it doesn't cut it with a modern turbo-diesel.

Running an engine with incorrect valve clearances can lead to valve and upper-cylinder damage, and while it's not something that should require a full re-set every 30,000km, you might find that one or two clearances will need to be adjusted each time. That will increase as the engine wears and the clearances become more inclined to adjust themselves in-service.

Don't forget, too, that the 4N15 engine in the Triton features variable valve timing, making correct clearances even more critical to the way it runs and its emissions.

problem
solution

Find a mechanic who knows what they're doing and won't fob you off with an 'I checked it by ear' explanation when the bill is handed over. Modern common-rail diesels are inherently noisy (mainly the injectors), and this makes it extremely difficult to accurately judge valve clearances just by listening.

We've heard of some dealerships that will do a 'by-ear' check while the vehicle is under warranty and then stick you for the bigger bill of actually checking the valves properly once the warranty is up. Since the MQ Triton is still under warranty, that's something to take up with the service manager when you drop the vehicle off.

You can't modify anything to get around this. Valve clearances change as components wear and the engine ages. But keeping on top of the maintenance will ensure that even if the clearances do change, they won't go to hell all of a sudden.

Plenty of oil and filter changes are the best way to protect an engine internally as well as making sure the intake is sealed from dust and water.

Shock failures
Maybe it's to do with the fact the Triton is somewhat stiffly suspended, or perhaps (more likely) it's due to the vehicle being built down to a price bracket that Mitsubishi's suppliers must work within, but whatever the reason, the vehicle seems to wear out its OE shock absorbers pretty quickly.

The fronts seem the first to go, probably because the leaf-sprung rear end is partly self-damping (thanks to the friction between the individual leaves). Still, after a relatively short time, the rears will become mushy and allow the vehicle to bounce around more than it should.

problem
solution

You can certainly talk to Mitsubishi about this if the shocks fail within the warranty period. That said, dampers are a wearing part – like brake pads, for instance – and there's an expectation they'll require replacement at some point. Whether you can convince your dealer your shocks have failed prematurely rather than simply in the name of acceptable wear-and-tear is the big question.

Given the OE dampers seem a bit underdone, the change you can make at the first damper-change point is to fit some better quality units. If you're sticking with the standard springs, a good quality set of dampers won't break the bank, and there are plenty around. Be guided by your workshop's recommendations and go for a known brand-name rather than something from an online seller who could be flogging any old rubbish.

If the budget allows and you want to go a bit radical, there are quite a few choices now in aftermarket by-pass shocks that were developed for off-road racing but are increasingly finding their way on to touring rigs that are often heavily loaded. These dampers are high-end pieces of gear and often include technology such as remote reservoirs and quality fittings. They're not cheap, though, and to maximise their effect, upgrading the springs at the same time makes sense.

Seeing in the dark
It has always amazed us that some manufacturers completely ignore lighting when they design a new vehicle. Enough people have complained about the Triton’s standard headlights, that this is worth a mention here. Interestingly, the facelift for 2019 of the Triton incorporates LED lights for both low and high beam, making us suspect Mitsubishi has reacted to this criticism.

problem
solution

Unfortunately, the new, facelifted lights can't be retro-fitted to the original MQ model, so you need to work with what you already have.

Lighting upgrades aren't uncommon in the world of modern vehicles, and there are many ways to go here. You can upgrade the existing headlights with more powerful globes, or add auxiliary lights that operate on high-beam to give you a much better view down the road.

Adding a more powerful globe is okay provided you don't exceed the maximum amount of heat the light housings and lenses (which are now almost always polycarbonate) can handle. Overdo it, and you can start melting bits and pieces, and that can lead to light failure when you need it least. If you do go for an upgrade, it might be wise to find a kit with an upgraded wiring loom, too, so that the replacement lights get enough power.

The hot-tip mod for most folks is to add an LED light bar which gives high-beam a big leg up. But not all light bars are created equal, and some of the imported, cheaper ones are pretty lame. Go for a name-brand and make sure it's wired up and earthed properly to avoid stray-current dramas that can – believe it or not – start to eat away at aluminium components like radiator cores. And even though LED lights draw less than conventional globes, the best advice is to run the light bar through a relay to avoid overheating the car's wiring and to ensure the full potential of the LEDs is unleashed.

And while LEDs are suitable, they generally provide a spreading light and don't reach as far down the road as a good set of conventional 100-Watt spotlights. You might also find that an LED light bar creates a lot of glare in areas where there are reflective road signs. So make sure you can isolate the light bar via a switch (which is a legal requirement anyway). Beyond that, the biggest problem is that switching from an aftermarket high-beam to a standard low-beam might convince you that you've gone momentarily blind.

Radio ga-ga
It won't bother you when you're dropping into Gunshot on the Old Telegraph Track, but when the modern four-wheel-drive is so much more than just a weekend warrior these days, the poor quality of the Triton's standard stereo system might annoy you.

People who own them reckon the Triton's stereo is one area where you can really see how it's been built down to a price, with scratchy reception and tinny speakers the main complaints.

problem
solution

There are plenty of aftermarket stereo solutions out there, so choosing one becomes a matter of balancing the sound you want with the budget you have in mind. Remember that the Triton's standard unit is a double-DIN fitment, so you need to buy a replacement that is tailored to the vehicle. While you're at it, you can also add front and rear cameras and all sorts of connectivity the standard car doesn't have.

The trickiest bit is finding a front speaker that fits thanks to the design of the standard speakers which incorporate the speaker unit into a plastic mounting arrangement. But our experts reckon a replacement speaker can be used with an aftermarket spacer-ring and everything goes back together just peachy.

Who's knocking?
Another minor one in the bigger scheme of things, but many owners have told us that one of the things that continues to annoy them day in, day out is a tapping noise from the passenger’s seat-belt tapping on the B-pillar trim. Apparently, every time the Triton hits a bump, the metal catch of the seat-belt clacks against the plastic pillar-trim. It sounds petty, but lesser things have driven grown men (and women) mad over the years.

problem
solution

One of those self-adhesive Velcro patches (the soft, fuzzy half) stuck to the pillar seems to do the trick. It doesn’t stop the belt buckle hitting the B-pillar, but it does muffle the racket. That’ll do.