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NSW BULL BAR LAWS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE

THIS ISN’T
APRIL FOOL’S

4WDers, for the most part, need bull bars. Not only are they a tool that provides peace of mind while driving outback tracks with fauna all around, but they also provide your vehicle with somewhere to mount various accessories, and sometimes increased capability with an improved approach angle. In NSW the government had passed an exemption for those whose bull bars, whether through their fault or the manufacturer’s, did not comply with the laws. But with the exemption coming to an end in September, we’re here to let you know what you need to look out for to make sure your bull bar complies to the law.

The exemption period for uncompliant bull bars is coming to an end in NSW – is your bull bar safe?

PROFILE AND EDGES
The shape and profile of your bull bar is a massive factor not only when it comes to purchasing one, but also in terms of the legality. How your bull bar may not be legal in this way is the angle. Your bull bar cannot exceed forward 75mm or nine degrees from its mounting point on the vehicle. You’re also not allowed to have any sharp forward-facing edges, or open frames.

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PROJECTIONS
The way your bull bar protrudes and projects out at different angles and places can also get you into trouble. Your bull bar can only step up in vertical height up to 100mm unless you use tubing to perform the step in which case a greater height change is allowed. In terms of mounted items to your bull bar brackets or other objects connected to your bull bar, these must be mounted behind the front face and not protrude above the top of the bull bar.

WIDTH
This point may be common sense but it still should be checked. Your bull bar cannot be wider than your wing mirrors and if there aren’t any wing mirrors it can’t be any wider than 150mm on either side. If you’re concerned, check that your vehicle stays within 2.5m of overall width.  

OBSCURED LIGHTS AND NUMBERPLATES
One of the common reasons behind purchasing a bull bar is to have somewhere to mount extra driving lights. However it will be the lights you can’t see that will get you in strife. If your bull bar obscures or covers any of your lights you must have additional lights that fulfil its role fitted. A common example is a vehicle’s fog lights; when a bull bar is fitted most manufacturers move fog lights to the bottom of the bar.

An obscured number plate is a big no-go. Your numberplate must be upright, roughly parallel to the axles, and must be visible from 20 metres away within a 45° arc of the numberplate either side of the vehicle. So be careful if you think you’re going to cleverly move it to the side so it’s out of the way of your winch, as you could get caught out.

FRONTAL VISION AND GROUND CLEARANCE
In the case your bull bar comes up above your bonnet you must still have an unobstructed view of the surface of the road 11m in front of you while sitting in a normal driving position. A final thing to note, although it probably doesn’t apply to most people – if your bull bar protrudes below your vehicle you must still have more than 100mm of clearance from the ground.

Along with all these points, two important rules also need to be noted, even if it seems like common sense. The first, your bull bar must be compatible to the vehicle it is fitted to, and secondly, it must be fitted according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For more information about the rules, click here to visit the government website.

NEWS Industry

THIS ISN’T
APRIL FOOL’S

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE

NSW BULL BAR LAWS

4WDers, for the most part, need bull bars. Not only are they a tool that provides peace of mind while driving outback tracks with fauna all around, but they also provide your vehicle with somewhere to mount various accessories, and sometimes increased capability with an improved approach angle. In NSW the government had passed an exemption for those whose bull bars, whether through their fault or the manufacturer’s, did not comply with the laws. But with the exemption coming to an end in September, we’re here to let you know what you need to look out for to make sure your bull bar complies to the law.

The exemption period for uncompliant bull bars is coming to an end in NSW – is your bull bar safe?

PROFILE AND EDGES
The shape and profile of your bull bar is a massive factor not only when it comes to purchasing one, but also in terms of the legality. How your bull bar may not be legal in this way is the angle. Your bull bar cannot exceed forward 75mm or nine degrees from its mounting point on the vehicle. You’re also not allowed to have any sharp forward-facing edges, or open frames.

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENT

ADVERTISEMENT

PROJECTIONS
The way your bull bar protrudes and projects out at different angles and places can also get you into trouble. Your bull bar can only step up in vertical height up to 100mm unless you use tubing to perform the step in which case a greater height change is allowed. In terms of mounted items to your bull bar brackets or other objects connected to your bull bar, these must be mounted behind the front face and not protrude above the top of the bull bar.

WIDTH
This point may be common sense but it still should be checked. Your bull bar cannot be wider than your wing mirrors and if there aren’t any wing mirrors it can’t be any wider than 150mm on either side. If you’re concerned, check that your vehicle stays within 2.5m of overall width.  

FRONTAL VISION AND GROUND CLEARANCE
In the case your bull bar comes up above your bonnet you must still have an unobstructed view of the surface of the road 11m in front of you while sitting in a normal driving position. A final thing to note, although it probably doesn’t apply to most people – if your bull bar protrudes below your vehicle you must still have more than 100mm of clearance from the ground.

OBSCURED LIGHTS AND NUMBERPLATES
One of the common reasons behind purchasing a bull bar is to have somewhere to mount extra driving lights. However it will be the lights you can’t see that will get you in strife. If your bull bar obscures or covers any of your lights you must have additional lights that fulfil its role fitted. A common example is a vehicle’s fog lights; when a bull bar is fitted most manufacturers move fog lights to the bottom of the bar.

An obscured number plate is a big no-go. Your numberplate must be upright, roughly parallel to the axles, and must be visible from 20 metres away within a 45° arc of the numberplate either side of the vehicle. So be careful if you think you’re going to cleverly move it to the side so it’s out of the way of your winch, as you could get caught out.

Along with all these points, two important rules also need to be noted, even if it seems like common sense. The first, your bull bar must be compatible to the vehicle it is fitted to, and secondly, it must be fitted according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For more information about the rules, click here to visit the government website.