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CLEANING DPF SYSTEMS

GUIDE DPF: Part 4

What do DPF additives do?
There are more than a few options on the market, as ‘fuel additives’ to assist in DPF regenerating and keeping your DPF alive longer. They supposedly achieve this by reducing the temperature the soot (read: particulate matter) needs to reach before it begins to oxidize and burn off – essentially allowing your DPF to do its thing sooner and more efficiently. Most of them increase the cetane rating of your fuel a touch, and also work as injector cleaners too; there’s not really any great reason not to lob a can through your tank every so often.

There are more than a few options on the market. They work by reducing the temperature at which the particulate matter is burnt off, making the regeneration more efficient.

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Do DPF cleaners actually work?
The jury is still out on this one – with some screaming snake oil, while others saying it works a treat; so, which is it?

Our thoughts on this one are twofold. On the one hand, they assist with the DPF burning off sooner, and more efficiently, and they help keep the rest of the fuel system (injectors and tank) clean. That said, your DPF will automatically regen itself, so does it really need to be made ‘more efficient’?   

On the other hand, the filter ‘mesh’ (for want of better words), has a temperature and burn-off limitation. Over time, they will flog out, similarly to the petrol catalytic converters. It’s certainly possible that the additives may reduce the lifespan of the filter material.

Most additives on the market for DPF cleaning purposes suggest being run through a tank of fuel every 5000km or so, so it’s probably a wise idea to throw one through every so often.

CLEANING DPF SYSTEMS CONT'D

  

What do DPF additives do?
There are more than a few options on the market, as ‘fuel additives’ to assist in DPF regenerating and keeping your DPF alive longer. They supposedly achieve this by reducing the temperature the soot (read: particulate matter) needs to reach before it begins to oxidize and burn off – essentially allowing your DPF to do its thing sooner and more efficiently. Most of them increase the cetane rating of your fuel a touch, and also work as injector cleaners too; there’s not really any great reason not to lob a can through your tank every so often.

CLEANING DPF SYSTEMS

GUIDE DPF: Part 4

There are more than a few options on the market. They work by reducing the temperature at which the particulate matter is burnt off, making the regeneration more efficient.

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Do DPF cleaners actually work?
The jury is still out on this one – with some screaming snake oil, while others saying it works a treat; so, which is it?

Our thoughts on this one are twofold. On the one hand, they assist with the DPF burning off sooner, and more efficiently, and they help keep the rest of the fuel system (injectors and tank) clean. That said, your DPF will automatically regen itself, so does it really need to be made ‘more efficient’?   

On the other hand, the filter ‘mesh’ (for want of better words), has a temperature and burn-off limitation. Over time, they will flog out, similarly to the petrol catalytic converters. It’s certainly possible that the additives may reduce the lifespan of the filter material.

Most additives on the market for DPF cleaning purposes suggest being run through a tank of fuel every 5000km or so, so it’s probably a wise idea to throw one through every so often.

CLEANING DPF SYSTEMS CONT'D